thoughts

Hinduism Scientific Fact

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ELDER'S FEET

Science behind touching feet of elders

Whenever we see someone pious or advanced in spirituality, it naturally comes in the heart of an Indian to touch their feet and take their blessings. This custom has been prevalent since centuries and marks the respect which we give to our elders or someone who is senior than is in the matter of understanding the spiritual aspect of the human life.

The science behind touching the feet of elder goes like this:

The nerves that start from our brain spread across all your body. These nerves or wires end in the fingertips of your hand and feet. When you join the fingertips of your hand to those of their opposite feet, a circuit is immediately formed and the energies of two bodies are connected. Your fingers and palms become the ‘receptor’ of energy and the feet of other person become the ‘giver’ of energy.

Usually, the person of whose feet you are touching is either old or pious. When they accept your respect which came from your reduced ego (shraddha) their hearts emit positive thoughts and energy (kripa) which reaches you through their hands and toes.

Their blessing creates an aura which helps us to get to the higher understandings and gives the recipient some share of the piety which the elder has earned.

Meaning of Gayatri Mantra

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gayatri-mantra

Goddess Gayatri or the Mother of all the Vedas is adored and praised by chanting the powerful Gayatri mantra. The word ‘Gayatri’ itself explains the reason for the existence of this mantra. It has its origin in the Sanskrit phrase Gayantam Triyate iti, and refers to that mantra which rescues the chanter from all adverse situations that may lead to mortality.

The first line ‘Om bhur bhuvah svah’ is not actually part of a Gayatri mantra and it is a special utterance called ‘vyahriti’ that has been added to the beginning of the famous mantra.

The First word ‘OM’ is the prime subject around which the entire creation revolves and it is the permanent truth within which everything exists. It is an auspicious sound made at the beginning of many prayers.

The expression ‘bhur bhuvah’ and ‘svah’ is technical, but a simple way to think of it is as a “call to creation,” that the light of the sun (the light of God) shines on the earth (bhur), in the sky (bhuvah), and in space (svah), and therefore the implication is, “let that light also shine on me.”

The word-to-word breakdown of the Gayatri mantra that most Hindus know is:

tat– that (God)

savitur– of the sun

varenyam– the best

bhargo (bhargas)– light, illumination

devasya– divine

dhimahi– let us meditate (a verb)

dhiyo (dhiyah)– thought(s)

yo (yah)–which

nah –of us, our

prachodayat– May it push, inspire (a verb)

 

The most important word in the Gayatri mantra is the word, “tat” which is a neuter pronoun meaning “that.” It is a reference to “that One,” God.

The sun, which is the source of illumination, heat, food and so many other things in our life, can naturally be seen as the “representative” or symbol of God in this world.

There are two verbs in the Gayatri mantra, ‘dhimahi’ and ‘prachodayat’.

Dhimahi means, “let us meditate on the light (bhargo) of the sun which represents God.”

This is the basic meaning of the first part of the Gayatri Mantra.

Coming to the second part, the verb ‘prachodayat’ literally means, “it should push,” but in more poetic language we can translate it as “let it inspire.”

Dhiyah is “thoughts,” so dhiyo yo nah prachodayat means, “may our thoughts be inspired”

Thus the most literal meaning of the Gayatri mantra is:

“Let us meditate on the light of the sun which represents God, and may our thoughts be inspired by that divine light.”