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The essential festival of Bihar-Chhat puja

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Introduction

Chhat puja is the main festival of the people living in Bihar, the state lying in the North East of India. Also known as Surya shashthi, it is one of the great festivals which is offered as veneration to Suryadeva, the sun demigod.

It is a festival of the Hindu religion dedicated to the God of energy, also known as Dala Chhath or Surya Shashti. People corroborate this festival to offer thanks to the Lord Surya for blessing the life on the earth.

Rituals of Chhat puja

  • 1st day : The people take bathe in early morning in the holy water of Ganges and bring some water to their home for the offerings. The home and its surroundings must be nicely cleaned this day. They take only one meal a day known as kaddu-bhat.
  • 2nd day : The devotees keeps fast for whole day and break their fast in the evening after sunset after the worship of Sun. They offer kheer, puris, fruits in the puja. After taking meal in the evening, they go on a fast without water for the next 36 hours.
  • On the third day (day of Chhath) they offer the Sanjhiya Arghya at the ghat of riverbank. After Arghya, they wear the single saree of turmeric color. . At the night of Chhath a vibrant event of Kosi is celebrated by lighting the lamps of clay diyas under the covering of five sugarcane sticks. The five sugarcane sticks indicate the Panchatattva (earth, water, fire, air and space) that human body made of Panchatattva.
  • On the early morning of the fourth day (Paarun), devotees along with their family and friends offer Bihaniya Aragh at the ghat of riverbank of Gange. Devotees end their festival through breaking the fast by having the Chhath prasadam.

Science behind Chhat puja

tages of Chhath Puja

There are six great stages of the Chhath puja which are:

  • The belief of fast and cleanliness of body on the festival identify the detoxification of the body and mind in order to set up the body and mind to accept the cosmic solar energy.
  • Standing in water with half of the body inside the water diminishes the escape of energy as well as facilitates the prana to elevate to the sushumna.
  • Then the entrance of cosmic solar energy takes place in the pineal, pituitary and hypothalamus glands (known as the Triveni complex) by the retina and optic nerves.
  • In the 4th stage Triveni complex gets activated.
  • After activation of the Triveni complex, spine gets polarized and body of devotee gets transformed into a cosmic powerhouse and gets the Kundalini Shakti.
  • At this stage the devotee is fully able to conduct, recycle and pass on the energy into entire universe.

 

 

☀️ Mythological significance of offering water to the sun ☀️

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Manish Tak

Sun is the source of energy for the whole universe.Sun is considered as the significator of Health, eyes, social prestige, father and profession.

When we offer water to the Sun and recite the mantra,Sun gets strengthened and the water gets empowered. When we touch this water on our body, those energy points gets stimulated thereby giving us tremendous energy and all the areas mentioned above get better.

 

Adoring the Surya Devta

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||Om Surya Devam Namaste Stu Grihaanam Karoona Karam
Arghyam Ch Falam Sanyukta Gandh Maalyaakshatai Yutam ||

Surya Dev or the Sun God is the highly revering deity in Hindu mythology. Being the head of all the nine planets, Surya dev has immense strength and he controls the life on earth. Blessed with heavenly powers he is portrayed as riding the chariot which is driven by 7 horses or 1 horse with 7 heads. The number seven defines the seven majestic colors of the rainbow, the seven seasons and also the seven chakras of the human body.

Surya is widely worshipped by devotees, including the asuras or demons. Surya Devta is adored by the Saura sect, which worships him as one of the five main Gods. Yatudhanas, group of demons, were also the deep followers of Surya. Even the Greeks and Romans have special mention of Sun God in their ancient mythology.

Significance of adoring Sun God:

Sun is considered as the significator of health, profession and father in the Vedic Astrology. The light energy of the Sun is a natural remedy for the body ailments and boosts us with energy and positivity. Vitamin D from the Sun is a healthy source for stronger immune system and bones. While offering water to the Sun God in early morning hours, the sunlight gets refracted and reflected due to the thin layer of water which leads to the production of 7 forms of light that get absorbed by our body. Since our body has large surface area, the rays are absorbed through it, maximum by the chest.

The Sun is the symbol of the Self-god. As the Self-god illuminates the mind, the intellect and the body, the Sun illuminates the world. Being the highest symbol of enlightenment the Surya devta bestows the devotee with knowledge and illuminates the dark lives of his devotees.

To receive intellectual strength, health, fame, will power and courage, book your Surya Puja now: http://www.shubhpuja.com/product/surya-puja/

 

Facts of Makar Sakranti

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Makar Sakranti marks the transition of the Sun into the zodiac sign of Capricorn on its celestial path. The festival is widely celebrated by flying kites and relishing the Tilguls. This fun filled festival is lot more than kites and Til chikkis, which can further be explored.

  • Makar sakranti is one of the festivals that are celebrated on the same day every year. Though once in every eight years, the date is postponed due to revolution and solar changes. This year it falls on 15th January.
  • The word ‘Sankranti’ signifies the movement of the sun from one zodiac sign to another. Thus, the name of the festival literally means the movement of the sun into Capricorn or Makar.
  • Makar Sankranti is referred as the ‘holy phase of transition’. It marks the end of an inauspicious phase which according to the Hindu calendar begins around mid-December.
  • Sankranti marks the termination ofwinter season and beginning of a new harvest or spring season. Thus beginning of warmer days and shorter nights.
  • The harvest festival of India is called by different names throughout India. Like Makar Sankranti in West India, down south, the festival is known as Pongal and in the north, it is celebrated as Lohri.
  • The sesame and jiggery ladoos are distributed among family and friends as it is considered beneficial in this transition season. It also represents a way of bonding and hoping for good health.
  • The tradition of kite flying began so that the physical body was exposed to the early morning sun rays. Being a critical time for flue and sickness, the warming sunrays proved to be beneficial. Thus kite flying became a fun way to do so.
  • It also marks the beginning of the Kumbh Mela in Uttar Pradesh while in South India, in Kerala, one of the most austere and difficult pilgrimages of Shabrimala ends on this auspicious day.
  • People also celebrate by taking a dip in the holy rivers flowing through states to cleanse themselves of sins. It is also believed that if you die during Makar Sankranti, you are not reborn and attain salvation.
  • It is the festival of Sun God and He is regarded as the symbol divinity and wisdom, the festival also holds an eternal meaning to it. The importance of this day has been signified in the ancient epics like Mahabharata also.

 

The harvest festival of Lohri

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Sweetness of rewari, fragrance of popcorn, illumination of bon fire and musical traditions; the pompous Lohri is here. The festival of happiness and joy holds immense traditional and cultural values. It is widely celebrated among parts of North India on 13th January every year. On the eve of this festival people gather around a bon fire and celebrate while dancing and singing traditional songs. Some of the unknown facts about this beautiful festival are as follows:

  • People believe that this festival is named after wife of Sant Kabir, Loi. Whereas another tale suggests that Holika and Lohri were sisters.
  • The festival is dedicated to Sun God as it is the transition phase from winters to the warmth of springs.
  • This festival marks the beginning of the harvest season and is a way to adore God for successful harvest in the new season.
  • The festival of Lohri is often related to the legend of Dulla Bhatti who was a heroic character during the Mughal Empire. Lohri is celebrated in honor of Dulla Bhatti with folk songs describing his brave saga.
  • The new bride is like a blessing to the family, similar to this festival of success and prosperity. Therefore newlywed couple celebrate this festival with all their family and friends.
  • People light a large bonfire at sunset, toss sesame seeds, gur, sugar-candy and rewaries in it, sit round it, sing, and dance till the fire dies out.